Learning to Drive With a Disability

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Just because you have a disability, it doesn’t mean you’re any less keen to get behind the wheel of a car and gain that first true taste of independence. But you might be wondering just how the process of learning to drive might differ for you.

As you’d expect, there aren’t any hard and fast guidelines on this – it will depend on the nature of your disability and how it might affect your ability to drive. But either way, it’s possible to make adaptations to cars to make your life easier, and thousands of people with disabilities learn to drive every year. You could be one of them!

Getting started

First off, it’s worth applying for your provisional licence. If you receive the Higher Rate Mobility Component (HRMC) of the Disability Living Allowance (DLA) or the Enhanced Rate Mobility Component of the Personal Independence Payment (PIP), you can actually apply for your provisional three months before you turn 16.

You’ll have to disclose your disability at this point, but only if it may affect your ability to drive. If you’re not sure about this, it may be worth consulting with your doctor. If it’s determined that your disability could affect your ability to drive, you might have to fill in a DVLA medical questionnaire.

Once you’ve got your hands on a provisional licence, it may then be a good idea to book a driving assessment at a centre like those run by Driving Mobility. This charitable organisation specialises in carrying out mobility assessments, and can help you determine the effect your disability may have on your ability to drive.

Learning to drive and taking the test

If you feel ready to get out on the open road and learn the ropes, it’s a good idea to seek out a driving school that offers specialised disability driving lessons.

At GoGoGo Intensive driving school Peterborough, we’ve taught hundreds of individuals to drive and helped them pass their test in no time. With a 90% pass rate, our course is certainly effective – and we even offer a free driving assessment six months after you pass your test to make sure you’re still on the right track.

Crucially though, we can also provide specialist disability driving lessons. Our team of disability driving instructors are experts in their field, and know how to make learning to drive an enjoyable and safe experience. They’ll teach you at your own pace, explain everything thoroughly and ensure you become a safe, confident and capable driver.

To find out more about our disability driver training, contact us today.

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